58: Church Life (Part II)


⬇️ ⬇️ SCROLL DOWN TO THE COMMENTS! ⬇️ ⬇️


In this episode, we will consider the topic of Church Life in Counseling God’s Way

God’s four means of getting His counsel to us: 

His Word, 


the Holy Spirit, 

prayer, 

but all in the setting of church life. 


We’ll see that counseling God’s way is not designed to take place in some sterile or secular or even professionalized Christian clinic. 


  • It’s not designed to take place there. 
  • Not saying it can’t take place there. 
  • Anyone that seeks God anywhere and sticks to His ways, 
  • God will work. 
  • It may be less than ideal, but we’re not saying that God cannot work there. 
  • But even if God is working somewhat in a situation that’s less than ideal, we don’t say, “Hey, great!” 
  • No, we say, praise God for what He’s done, but let’s all call each other to His more perfect way.


And it doesn’t condemn everyone out there in the so-called “Mental Health” field or out there in the clinics that are trying to help people. 


  • It doesn’t condemn them because a lot of them really do want to help people. 
  • And a lot of them are very compassionate and lay down their lives for others in many ways. 
  • And if they pray at times, if they point to the Lord at times, if they share the Word at times, God’s going to honor that. 
  • God is not a Pharisee. “Oh nope, that’s not perfect. I won’t be working until that’s perfect.” 
  • That’s the way man gets. 
  • If God were like that none of us would have any ministry.


The bottom line is that if any of us are doing it less than the way God designed, let’s call each other back to the right way. 


  • That’s all. 
  • I’m not saying we all know how to do it perfectly. 
  • But if we notice in our own lives that we’re off the track, may we be reproved or may we be convicted and let God adjust us. 
  • If we see others that are off track, even though God is using them in part, we go praise God for what He’s doing. 
  • Let’s all come back to God’s way. 
  • Let’s learn together how to do God’s way better.


God ordained for it to take place in church life, as a regular, normal part of member to member, one another relationships and ministry. 


  • That’s where God ordained it. 
  • we’ll look at a passage that is a picture of church life, living together.



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  • Tom Zimbelman says:

    True, convicting, and an encouraging reminder of how we as the body of Christ are to live. Three big points hit me:
    1) we are to lead the way in counseling. It seems most churches might give a session or two for people who are hurting and then refer them to the outside world to provide comprehensive counseling. I agree with Jeff, counseling needs to remain in-house and provided in a way that remains true to the Scriptures.
    2) Kindness is more powerful than we seem to understand. As Jeff emphasized, the world is so unkind that when kindness rears its head there is a clear distinction from the way the natural person deals with others – especially one’s enemies. The notable characteristic is that this type of authentic kindness is supernatural- it’s from God.
    3) Forgiveness is the big one. It can be difficult when we have been hurt by someone to truly forgive that person from the heart. We often hear we should forgive, but not forget in order to protect ourselves. but in light of what Jesus has done for us, who are we to withhold forgiveness from anybody? Especially if that person comes to us and asks for forgiveness. It takes humility to ask for forgiveness and we should be ready to give it. This is a conviction for me because I immediately thought of somebody who I have not fully forgiven. It’s a tough situation, but it’s necessary.

    Thanks for the podcast Pastor Jeff.

    • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

      Thanks for your post Tom. In line with Pastor Jeff’s teaching, I agree with you on your three big points from Church life (Part II). As the body of Christ, we are expected to lead the way of counseling knowing that God is ultimately the Counselor (Jesus, the Wonderful Counselor) and we are instruments of His counsel; and God will counsel using the Word of God, our prayerful lives, empowered by the work of the Holy Spirit in the context of ministering one to the other. Also, kindness is more powerful than we seem to understand (Ephesians 4:32 admonishes us as the body of Christ to be kind to one another – sounds powerless in the eyes of the world but there’s power in changing lives, transforming lives and building the Church of God by just being kind to one another.). In addition to these, we are to forgive one another, even as God in Christ forgave us. This is quite big for me personally as I am yet to attain this height, but I die daily to self and I let Christ increase in me. (1 Corinthians 15:31 … I die daily. John 3:30 He must increase, but I must decrease.). By the Grace of God, we shall soon be like Him in every aspect of our lives in Jesus Name, Amen.

    • Athena Williams says:

      It’s true that counseling should be done within the body, but it’s also hard for individuals to know how to address issues like this in the church. It’s scary to think of humbly approaching church leadership and explaining the dangers of practices and policies they’ve had for years. It takes a lot of prayer and discernment to know how and when to open this kind of conversation.

  • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

    This is a timely Podcast in speaking of the importance of Church Life in Biblical Counseling; knowing that God is ultimately the Counselor (Jesus, the Wonderful Counselor) and we are instruments of His counsel. Pastor Jeff declared that if Christ is allowed to counsel; He’s going to use the Word of God, our prayerful lives, empowered by the work of the Holy Spirit in the context of Church life (i.e. ministering one to the other).
    Reflecting on the foundation laid in Church Life (Part I) and listening to Church Life (Part II); we know that Christ is the head of the Church and we are the body; and we are enjoined to be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another (Romans 12:10) – living a Church life of ‘you first’.
    I am so grateful for this teaching as it will help us do things orderly and in humility; totally opposite to the ways of the world.
    Ephesians 4:32 And be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you.
    1 Corinthians 14:40 Let all things be done decently and in order.
    1 Peter 5:5 … Yes, all of you be submissive to one another, and be clothed with humility, for “God resists the proud, But gives grace to the humble.”

    • Anne Marie Maguire says:

      Thanks Esther nice comment: “I am so grateful for this teaching as it will help us do things orderly and in humility; totally opposite to the ways of the world.” I do agree that God is the counselor and as we humble ourselves he will begin to use us within our local church to be of help.

    • Athena Williams says:

      I agree, Esther. I loved Pastor Jeff’s point about kindness; it seems like such a simplistic concept, but the power of the Holy Spirit can use kindness as a witness to the world. John 13:35 “By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.” We get so wrapped up in self that we can miss out on opportunities to show the world that Christ is the answer they’re looking for.

  • Ritter Savino says:

    Thank you again Pastor Jeff. These Bible verses (Romans 12:10; Luke 9:32; Ephesians 4:32; Colossians 3:13; Galatians 5:13) you use bring so much clarity of what it is God wants the body of Christ to be. I used to be so confused about scriptures, but the more I read the Bible, the more it becomes simple to understand; and of course, the Holy Spirit is constantly the One who is revealing the truth to us. You mentioned different ministries such as the “kindness” ministry, the “forgiving” ministry, and the “bearing with one another” ministry. I thought that this was very interesting. I never saw it as ministries; that ministered to me. I will be using that from now on. I also love the “bearing with one another” part where you said that it means to put up with each other, but not to leave out the exhortation and edification. I have used this before and it is very effective. It gives a better picture of what it is to bear with one another, it brings conviction.

    • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

      I agree with you Ritter that we are deeply grateful to Pastor Jeff for using these Bible verses (Romans 12:10; Luke 9:32; Ephesians 4:32; Colossians 3:13; Galatians 5:13) to make us have better clarity of what God’s expectations are for the body of Christ, the Church. I also wouldn’t have used these Scriptures in relationship to Church Life as Pastor Jeff has explicitly taught us in the Podcast, but I have better understanding now.
      May God help us to be true Christians in the body of Christ, being kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another; dying to self daily and following Christ; being tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave us; being brethren that have been called to liberty; not using our liberty as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serving one another.
      Thanks for your post Ritter.

    • Anne Marie Maguire says:

      Very true Ritter those acts of kindness, forgiveness and bearing with one another are actual ministry within the body of Christ and it’s exciting that we as church members can be involved in the care of others by doing these acts, showing that we are Christ’s disciples. “A new commandment I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so also you must love one another. By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you love one another.”
      John 13:34-35.

      • Ritter Savino says:

        We get to serve God this way, by serving others in a way that will honor and glorify God. What a privilege! Thank you Anne Marie and God bless!

    • Josiah Arceo says:

      That is so good! The statement you mentioned in the end stood out to me. There is such a thing as being able to be kind and forgiving yet not neglecting to admonish or rebuke when necessary. This concept reminds me the most of what the jobs of Biblical counselors should be doing; they are called to both provide comfort and to confront in accordance to the Word of God. All comfort and no confrontation leads to mercy but no trust in the strength of the Word of God, yet all confrontation but no comfort leads to disdain of the Word of God after being bashed with its commandments over and over again.

  • Anne Marie Maguire says:

    Beautiful verses Jeff about the one another ministry of the church. And how counseling (soul care) happens in the local church.

    Verses that speak about the one another ministries in Church life:

    Receiving and giving preference, honor to one another:
    Romans 12:10: “Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another.” (Instead of me first the worldly attitude, the self life.)

    Be kind, forgiving to one another:
    Ephesians 4:32: “And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” (There is power in being kind, being forgiving.)

    Ya the cliques are strong in churches and it’s hard to get close to people. (Closed groups)
    I was asking God a while back why am I on the outside? And after that prayer my eyes were opened and I looked around and saw others in the same position, so this is my place to help those on the outside, so I began reaching out to those around me.

    Bear with one another, forgive:
    Colossians 3:13: “Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.” (Great verse of patience of putting up with one another. Just hang in there.)

    Serve one another:
    Galatians 5:13: “For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.” (Don’t use our freedom to go back into the flesh and instead serve one another.)

    Thanks Jeff will be studying these verses more!

    • Josiah Arceo says:

      Pastor Jeff mentioned many verses. What I loved about them is that you can tell that although they sound simple and overused, Pastor Jeff is highly passionate about them because he knows that they work.

      I have my own personal weaknesses and I am thankful that God has given me strength to forgive others, but often the most difficult thing about forgiveness is not the act, but the intense bitterness that seems to linger. In my heart, though I know that I have forgiven someone, I still have to ask the Lord for the strength to not hold bitterness.

    • Jerry Troyer says:

      Anne Marie, I greatly value your comments. I recently changed churches and found myself as an outsider. The first time I can remember that. I was always an insider. In leadership. But at the new church, I am definitely an outsider. No other way to describe it. I tried to maneuver into the inner circle but the group is closed. No openings. Do not apply. Like you, I observed those on the outside and started communication. We have formed “the outsiders” small group. It is flourishing. Now to see if we will invite other outsiders to join our group.

  • Josiah Arceo says:

    Wow that was so good! The biggest takeaway from both podcasts is that the counseling situation should be done inside the church and rightfully so since the Word of God has implied that everyone should grow together by truth and love (Ephesians 4:15-16) and because of the natural design of fellowship making accountability straightforward. One of the verses Pastor Jeff referenced that stood out to me was Ephesians 4:32. Working with the youth, it is common to hear the youth either picking on each other or calling each other out for whatever reason. In my mind when I see or hear it happen, I think to myself, “Hey they are just kids and this is what they do.” Little do I know that instead of being a bystander in the situation that I can have a positive impact by asking them to be kind to one another. Kindness and forgiveness has the effect of promoting unity within the fellowship.

    • Juan Alejandro Anchondo says:

      I totally know what you mean about missing an opportunity for ministry. I have written off things before, “they are just kids; they didn’t mean it like that; I must have misheard.” It is so important to see each moment as an opportunity to serve God, and further the discipleship of the students, and even the adults too! We all need that healthy, not awkward, accountability throughout life, and as ministers it is important to be lovingly on “high alert.”

    • Tobiah Pilgrim says:

      Kindness and forgiveness promotes unity. What a novel concept. Its so hard to see the unkindness and un-forgiveness on social media platforms and in the news media. Instead of unity, of course, we see division. Nothing good can come from such an individualistic attitude. Which is also interesting because many of those same people are crying for equality and tolerance, but that is a whole other discussion I suppose.

      • Greg Nelson says:

        Yeah, I think the reason we see the division on social media is almost like the division that we have when we are in our own vehicle. When people feel like they will never be found out, or have the light shine on their sins then its a free for all to hurt anyone who comes in front of them. This is very unfortunate because we are called to show that we are believers in Christ by our love for one another.

    • Jerry Troyer says:

      Hi Josiah, thank you for your insightful comments. I concur that within the church we should (need) to grow together in love and truth. I deal mainly with adults who are quick to point out mistakes in others and speak the truth, without grace. Could faith grow in our churches if we started speaking love and truth in grace. Rather than just blasting away with truth. Leading to bickering, fighting and drawn sabres? If adults started practicing truth with grace, there might be a chance youth would pick up on it and follow in like fashion. Thank you for the work and service you do with youth!

  • Johan Alarcon says:

    Be kindly affectionally to one another, bearing with one another, put up with each other. when I first heard this, I didn’t know how to perceive it. But understanding how we are called to honor our neighbor is an affectionate way to show love to one another. In honor, giving preference to one another, to me since I gave my life to Christ, this has been easy to do especially when the next person is willing to be receiving the love. But I question when the person doesn’t want nothing to do with the love and affection that I am trying to express. We are called to be kind; Pastor Jeff says we need to exemplify love and kindness regardless the situation, but yet I see how people take our kindness for weakness and I’m still in the process to not take any of this personal. “Forgiving seems so costly”, I can relate with that statement, in the past I have had heated discussions with people and refused to forgive or ask them for forgiveness from that person because then I would think they would be taking that as weakness. We are forgiven from God so who are we not to forgive another person who trespassed against us, so true.

    • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

      True Johan, ‘we are forgiven by God to forgive others that trespassed against us’ as true Christians (Matthew 18:21-35). We, as the body of Christ should live to manifest the genuine love and forgiveness of Christ to the world, living like Christ and being constrained/ compelled/ driven by the love of Christ:
      2 Corinthians 5:14 For the love of Christ compels us, because we judge thus: that if One died for all, then all died.
      Ephesians 4:2 with all lowliness and gentleness, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love.
      Hebrews 10:24 And let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works.
      1 Peter 1:22 Since you have purified your souls in obeying the truth through the Spirit in sincere love of the brethren, love one another fervently with a pure heart.

    • Margaret Deherrera says:

      Thank you for your post, I can relate to what you are saying when I first heard this I didn’t know how to take it either, but after I gave my life to Christ and let God in my heart I saw things in a different way. All though some times its easier for me to forgive others and ask for forgiveness from others then other times. Some days I really have to be in the word and in prayer and ask God to help with those tasks of forgiving and asking for forgiveness because some days I’ m like their gonna mistake that for a weakness. I find myself saying sometimes forgive as I have been forgiven and that helps me to not give in to my fleshly desires, and try and hold grudges. It is so hard not to take things people do to us personally, and want to do things how they did us. That is where remembering the scriptures helps some times.

    • Ritter Savino says:

      “putting up with each other” I didn’t fully understand what God was saying here, and the picture that Pastor Jeff gave me was a great picture. Longsuffering is the word that comes to mind. This is what God has done with us before Christ, and still after and until He perfects us at His coming. God has loved us and continues to love us with a love that is unconditional. My prayer is that I will love the way He loves!

  • Athena Williams says:

    Thank you, Pastor Jeff, for this important reminder of what it means to love one another and die to self in our everyday relationships. We all need to be reminded so often – at least I know I do! I constantly find myself justifying selfishness in my life and making excuses for not loving others. It’s frustrating because I know that God’s ways are better than my ways, and I want to walk in obedience (Romans 7:14 – 25). It’s so good to discuss this because all believers struggle with sin, and we need to exhort and encourage one another – not that it’s okay to sin, but that we can rejoice in God’s abundant grace!

    • Juan Alejandro Anchondo says:

      I agree with you Athena. All of us need constant reminders of even these foundational things. Whether we are justifying our sins, or totally ignorant of how we have begun to fall short in loving those around us, its God’s Word that will bring to our attention these issues.

    • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

      Thanks for your response Athena to this week’s Podcast by Pastor Jeff and I agree with you that it’s a very important reminder for us as it pertains to ‘what it means to love one another and die to self in our everyday relationships’, especially in Church life. This for me is an urgent call to be true Christians indeed (John 13:34-35 A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.”).
      Loving one another is a commandment that calls for obedience as children of God (John 15:12-13 This is My commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.).

    • David Bowman says:

      Athena, I agree wholeheartedly! Dying to self is a painful process at times (see Jesus). Our selfish flesh dies a slow agonizing death. I have found creative ways to justify my indifference or lack of kindness, but there are no excuses for it. I often have this struggle with those that are in spiritual authority, however they are not exempt from being forgiven and receiving kindness. Holy Spirit help us to decrease more and more.

    • Margaret Deherrera says:

      I totally agree with you Athena because I also find myself trying to justify why its alright for me to be rude to someone who is rude to me, or to treat someone disrespectful because they did that to me. This is a area I battle with some days but one thing I can say is God is so faithful and kind and seems to always show me thru his Spirit this is not what I have called you to do, you are to love one another as I have loved you and respect everyone no matter what they do to you because it is not about you, It is about what I have done for you. He seems to always remind me that His grace is sufficient no matter what I am forgiven and I must forgive as He has forgiven me, but to many times i want to give into my selfish desires and not do what God says to do. I’m grateful to have others to encourage and help me by speaking truth of God’s word verses what I want to hear.

  • Juan Alejandro Anchondo says:

    I think there is something to be said about reminding ourselves that when we harbor bitterness, unforgiveness, or hate against another believer we are sinning against God’s child and ourselves. We are interconnected with that person we are unkind to. This means we are harming ourselves by harming the Body as a whole. More importantly, when we are rude, selfish, or standoffish to other believers we are offending God the Father. And just like any father here on earth would be hurt or angered when his children are left out, harmed, or offended, the Father in heaven is as well.
    So, be kind to one another and bare long with one another’s faults.

    • Esther Ambie-Barango says:

      Hi Alejandro, I agree with your post, especially in your declaration that ‘when we are rude, selfish, or standoffish to other believers, we are offending God the Father’, reminding me of the Scripture that admonishes us to walk in the Spirit, not manifesting the works of the flesh (Galatians 5:19-26 Now the works of the flesh are evident, which are: adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lewdness, idolatry, sorcery, hatred, contentions, jealousies, outbursts of wrath, selfish ambitions, dissensions, heresies, envy, murders, drunkenness, revelries, and the like; of which I tell you beforehand, just as I also told you in time past, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law. And those who are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit. Let us not become conceited, provoking one another, envying one another.).
      It is important for us as the body of Christ, the Church to walk in the Spirit, denying self and dying daily to be Christians indeed, pleasing our God, our Father.

    • David Bowman says:

      Juan, that is a great point. In my years of going to church, I have witnessed all types of behavior under the guise of Christian love (passive aggressiveness, indifference, etc.). It is a sin indeed, and it is incompatible with the gracious gift of salvation and forgiveness we received in Christ. As Pastor Jeff said, “there is power in kindness”, even in a world that is as divisive as ours.

  • Pablo G Valdez Acosta says:

    What a great podcast,
    AT work my job right now is to keep the pantry open and stocked to provide food to those in need. We had to implement procedures because people would not wait or take advantage of others and cut lines and be abusive. No longer we can die to self we have to be first and Jesus is not happy with it, it is ok to be last it is ok to not get our own way and let others be first.
    We had people step in and argue with us because they deserve to be served first due to being American and citizens, others because they don’t want to be seen being helped. It is sad because we have food for everyone and we treat and see all equally but they cannot. We pray daily that God reminds them.
    But an update with the new procedures we are safe and we have streamlined the process.
    Die to self to live eternally
    Thank you for a great biblical reminder.

  • Jerry Troyer says:

    Thank you Professor. That was powerful and thought provoking! Romans 12:10b (ESV), “Outdo one another in showing honor”. Referencing,1 Peter 2:17a “Honor everyone” and Phil. 2:3b “but in humility count others more significant than yourselves”. How seldom have I thought of consciously honoring someone. I did in a speech of a Golden Deeds award to a great humanitarian Christian servant. I do whenever I meet with the Senior Pastor I used to serve under. He now has dementia. I honor him from a position of love, free will and desire. Following this podcast I asked myself, do I only honor those who have made a significant impact or faith influence in my life? I respect others, I treat them with kindness (most or some of the time) but do I make a concerted effort to honor others. I honor my four year old neighbor girl who I adore. She adores me too. But do I honor the other two neighbor girls about the same age? Do I honor those I am not necessarily drawn to? Do I honor those who are not of significance to me or of influence in my life? I must no. I seldom honor those I am not drawn towards. But after the podcast I have a fresh beginning in honoring those I come into contact with throughout my days. I started this morning with the teen disinfecting the shopping carts at the grocery store. I thanked her for disinfecting my cart and I appreciated it.

    • JoAnn Eagle says:

      Jerry, what a great post! I so appreciate your honest personal reflection. This caused me to consider who I honor as well! We should be honoring all we encounter and not just those we prefer. Isn’t that cyclical behavior? We honor those we prefer, which in reality is preferring ourselves! The flesh is still right smack in the middle! I join you in striving to honor all. Thank you for the great reminder.

  • David Bowman says:

    This podcast brought great light onto the importance of “Church Life” in the biblical counseling process. In the handful of counseling sessions I have conducted, I have quickly realized that it is foolish to depend solely on the one-on-one sessions to cause true biblical change. It is also quite prideful to think in that way. The many “one another” statements in Scripture (Rom. 12:10, Eph. 4:32 etc.) convicted me of being work-centric, instead of being people-centric. My introverted tendencies can cause me to tolerate people, instead of serving, loving, being kindly affectionate, and bearing with them as Christ bears with me. Great episode that provided sober conviction.

  • Greg Nelson says:

    One of the main things that stood out to me was the unfortunate reality that we, even as believers, still at times do not forgive others for the wrongs they have committed against us. Christ died for us, we should at the least be able to forgive others in our lives, when God forgives us every single day.

    • JoAnn Eagle says:

      Greg,
      I appreciate your post, as I had not honed in on the aspect of forgiveness in my original recap post. You are absolutely correct. Even believers do not forgive each other! I think that forgiveness takes humility. We have to humbly realize that we are sinners too, in need of God’s great forgiveness. We can only love because He loved us first (1 John 4:19). May you be an example to others in your local body of believers!

  • Margaret Deherrera says:

    Another great pod cast, thank you Pastor Jeff for the reminder of how we should be towards others and letting them go before us, and how we as Christians should die to self. Thanks for the reminder that we are to love one another as God has loved us first. My instinct used to be when someone was rude to me to be rude to them, but know I try and remind myself that’s not the way I’m supposed to be I’m to love everyone, as God has loved me. This world is so full of unforgiving, hurtful people who just want revenge or retaliation. Being kind and not giving into our selfish desires some times goes along way. None of it comes very easy it takes the work of the Holy Spirit to work in you to not do what you feel like doing sometimes and do what God has called us to do. it is a super natural thing as we were reminded by pastor Jeff.

  • Tobiah Pilgrim says:

    I like how you said, we can build up the body by being kind one to another. I like the imagery of a real body and the kindness one shows by eating healthy, getting exercise, etc. Each part of it is made stronger when we give preference to the part that needs it. As opposed to someone who is abusing their body with drugs, alcohol, bad diet, and other things. We are strengthened, enriched, and “built up” to christ-likeness as we minister to one another through something as simple as kindness, and through forgiveness, and giving honor to someone, and bearing or enduring with one another.
    I also like the reminder that its a supernatural work to be consistent in these things. I know in my own life I have at one time or another (or maybe many times over in some cases) stopped being one or more of these commands to someone in the church. I need to die to my selfishness on a daily basis to love others with the love of Jesus.

  • Kristie Gallagher says:

    This was a great reminder that it’s our kindness that leads people to Christ. It makes me think of Romans 2:4 which says, “It’s God’s kindness that leads you to repentance.” In the same way it’s our kindness toward others, not only outside the church, but inside the church that will lead people to Christ. Our love and attention toward one other should draw people to want to come and know Jesus are be drawn deeper into relationship with Him. It is sad to see the division within the body. Jesus calls us to be a light of the world that they would see our good works and glorify God. All that we do should shine a light on the goodness and kindness of God. Such a good reminder to walk in kindness especially in these unprecedented times.

  • JoAnn Eagle says:

    This was a great podcast! We need to be continually reminded that we are to prefer others above ourselves. Dying to self is a daily practice because the beast of self constantly wages for preference. We can get discouraged when selfishness is a continued practice within the church body. Newcomers can feel unwelcome and current members can feel unloved. Loving others is only done through the practice of having an ‘others focus.’ This means dying to self! In leading women’s ministries we would make new table group assignments for each new bible study session. In this way ladies would make new friends. This practice had much resistance though! Sadly, now that I’ve moved into the counseling ministry and away from directing women’s ministries, I see that groups stay together session after session and cliques are promoted. However, I can die to myself, prefer the new leader and her preferences above mine! The act of loving others always has to start with a healthy dose of humility.

  • Ethan Malis says:

    From Genesis to the Revelation we see God mending the relationship between Him and Humanity and Humanity with Humanity. Thinking about Church life is tough, because there are so many different Genres of Church. From different denominations, to different styles, to different ways of dressing and teaching, there are many different looking Church bodies. But one thing we know from scripture is that if you are in-Christ, then you are all apart of the same church body, and that church body is to emulate New Creation by loving in self sacrifice and service. It is our job to usher in new creation by living out God’s ideal restoration of humanity. So, we must read scriptures like these seriously, that unity needs to be on the forefront of our minds. The verse that Mr. Christianson brought up in Ephesians 4 comes right after talking about grieving the Holy Spirit, thus we conclude that when we are at odds with one another it grieves the Holy Spirit. We are to seek peace and pursue it with ALL people, but certainly we should be able to have unity inside the Church body itself.

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